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Mar 30, 2011

Social and economic impacts caused by nuclear accidents becoming evident

by PhilLee — last modified Mar 30, 2011 12:20 PM
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Our colleagues at Friends of the Earth Japan are writing a blog on life after the earthquake and tsunami. They will be documenting how they, and fellow citizens, are rebuilding their lives and addressing some of the issues that have arisen as the country recovers from its biggest crisis since World War II.

On 24 March a 64-age vegetable farmer in Fukushima committed suicide. It was just one day after the Japanese government declared restrictions on  eating several kinds of vegetables produced in Fukushima and neighbouring areas.

He had a cabbage patch growing 7500 cabbages. According to Mainichi Newspaper, his son said 'If we did not have the nuclear accidents, he would still be here today.'

In addition, last night, I saw on the NHK news that a very old Ryokan (Japanese Inn) in Fukushima was closed for the first time in more than 100 years due to cancellations after nuclear accidents.

The Ryokan was not affected by earthquake and tsunami, but it was 60km from the nuclear plants, outside of the evacuation zone. Rooms were fully booked up until mid-May. However, they were all cancelled after the nuclear accidents.

These are the stories covered by the major Japanese media, but I guess there are hundreds or thousands of similar stories.

It's really difficult to describe how I feel about this story.. It's just so sad. Those affected can ask for compensation or help from TEPCO, or the  government, but life will never be how it was before the accident.

NS

Demonstrating against nuclear power in Tokyo

by PhilLee — last modified Mar 30, 2011 12:05 PM
Filed Under:

Our colleagues at Friends of the Earth Japan are writing a blog on life after the earthquake and tsunami. They will be documenting how they, and fellow citizens, are rebuilding their lives and addressing some of the issues that have arisen as the country recovers from its biggest crisis since World War II.

Japan blog-water-demo-1On Sunday 27 March around 1,200 demonstrators walked through Ginza, one of the most famous shopping areas in Tokyo, to appeal against Japanese nuclear policy.

 

Alarmed by the nuclear crisis in Fukushima, several anti-nuclear groups, as well as individual activists, organised the demonstration to appeal for an evaluation of nuclear policy and prompt updates on the situation in Fukushima.

 

The crowd's chants were loud and direct:

 

"We need no Genpatsu (nuclear power plant)!"
"Stop Genpatsu right now!"
"No more Fukushima, no more Chelnobyl."
"Life is more important than electricity !"

The parade started from Ginza, went via the Tepco head office and cumulated in an assembly in Hibiya park.

Japan blog-demo-3A young woman from a small town 5km from Fukushima's first nuclear reactor spoke to the crowd about the serious situation faced by local people and appealed to save them.

A young man who lead the demonstration insisted that we Japanese citizens now have to speak as one voice to get rid of nuclear policy.

 

Some foreign media reported the demonstration, but no Japanese media.

Euronews coverage
BBC coverage
TF1 coverage

 

AY

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