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Photos

Portraits of people affected by land grabbing and images from Kalangala.
John Muyisa

John Muyisa

John Muyisa woke up one day to find bulldozers clearing his land to plant oil palms. John and his community have preserved their forests and lands for generations. Now their way of life is at risk.

John Muyisa - Read More…

Nathaniel Bagira

Nathaniel Bagira

Nathaniel Bagira is one of only a few in the small village of Kasenyi who have not lost land. He, however, is worried that once the forestland has been consumed by the plantation, his 3.7 acre plot may be given to the company. Without the plot he has nothing and no way of supporting himself. Credit: FoEI / ATI - Jason Taylor

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Land grabbing in Uganda

Land grabbing in Uganda

Some of the forest clearing taking place on a newly acquired plot of land, once dense tropical forest and now a wasteland awaiting its palm tree crop. With its location so close to the lake, people worry about pollution and what it will do to the lake. Credit: FoEI / ATI - Jason Taylor

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Land grabbing in Uganda II

Land grabbing in Uganda II

Some of the men and their machines on a newly cleared site of hundreds of acres by the lakeside. This land assumed by locals to be common land and therefore for public use was all of a sudden in the hands of the plantation owner, BIDCO. Locals were shown a piece of paper and told that BIDCO were now the new owners. Many people were invited to a meeting where they were given between 5’000 and 7’000 shillings (€1.5- €2) and then asked to sign for it. Their signatures have now been used to prove that compensation for the land has been given. Within three months the forest was destroyed, trees felled and pushed into the ground to rot and provide nutrients for the soils. Credit: FoEI / ATI - Jason Taylor

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Okia

Okia

Okia comes from the mainland and is a palm plantation security guard. He is employed to protect the land from locals looking for firewood or people attempting to remove diesel from the diggers. Credit: FoEI / ATI - Jason Taylor

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The Traders

The Traders

Many of the local islanders are able to create an income from selling surplus fruit and vegetables from their garden or the forest. This rich island used to have an abundant and free supply of jackfruit, mango, passion fruit and banana. Credit: FoEI / ATI - Jason Taylor

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Edward Okello

Edward Okello

There are many people like Edward Okello, aged 36. Hired from the mainland, he is employed by the plantation to cut down the once dense tropical forest. He does not see his work as destructive, he is just happy to have a job. Credit: FoEI / ATI - Jason Taylor

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John Zziwa

John Zziwa

John Zziwa is a farmer from the village of Njoga which is surrounded by palm plantations. John's neighbours (Epson and Rosemary) have joined the plantation scheme and have planted over forty acres with palm trees. Instead of walking home through a tropical forest John now walks through a plantation. Credit: FoEI / ATI - Jason Taylor

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Immelda Nabirimu

Immelda Nabirimu

Immelda Nabirimu from Buswa village farms 2.5 acres of sweet potatoes, cassava, banana, yams and goats. Her husband is a labourer for BIDCO, the company behind the plantation. Together they have nine children. The family have been threatened by BIDCO representatives who say that the land is theirs and want her to move away. Land speculators are constantly looking for land to sell or lease to the company, everyone’s land or right to land is under scrutiny. The hunger for profit is starting to tear apart a society that previously relied on subsistence farming. Credit: FoEI / ATI - Jason Taylor

Immelda Nabirimu - Read More…

Edison Musiimenta, Rosemary Nabukeera

Edison Musiimenta, Rosemary Nabukeera

Edison Musiimenta, Rosemary Nabukeera and daughter Maureen Nuwagaba have come from the mainland. Around eight years ago Edison came looking for work. He was so impressed with the quality of the soil and crop that he asked someone for a small plot of land to farm on. Edison is now one of the larger charcoal producers selling huge bags of the fuel to a mainland agent. For each sack he says he receives around 10’000 shillings (€3). All this is now at stake due to the development of the plantation. Credit: FoEI / ATI - Jason Taylor

Edison Musiimenta, Rosemary Nabukeera - Read More…

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